Communicating (with podcasts) through the Coronavirus crisis

How do you carry on with business amid a pandemic? That is the question facing numerous workplaces and institutions confronting the current reality of COVID-19. This is clearly a secondary consideration to the health of individuals, but the fear and reality of infection is creating an economic crisis on top of the public health emergency.

Many businesses are already telling their staff to operate remotely – where possible, and we are all aware that this unfolding situation could affect workplaces for weeks or even months.

Conferences, events and other gatherings are in doubt during this extraordinary period. But at the same time, it is critical that businesses keep working to maintain contacts, activity and personal connection with stakeholders, including clients and their own staff. Damage limitation and mitigation are huge considerations for the leaders of organisations and businesses – big and small – around the world.

If it can’t be business as usual, then it is critical that – at the very least – a new normality be temporarily instituted, that allows organisations to keep functioning and for the economy to keep turning. It is also critical that businesses communicate what they are doing, so that when the crisis passes, they can more easily recover and return to work.

The digital age presents a partial solution to this unprecedented situation. Apart from the manufacturers of hand sanitizers and toilet paper, products which help people connect remotely are going to find themselves in demand.

But beyond Zoom, Skype and other providers which allow for remote video calls and conferencing, there is a need to consider how more in-depth communications can function and help. Organisations need to continue to display their skills, expertise and presence throughout this time. In addition, they should consider how to maintain connections between staff members who are physically dispersed. It is important that people feel fully informed and maintain a link to their workplace.

Podcasts are one channel of communications that can serve a unique and useful purpose at this time. They provide a virtual platform to connect and exchange information. The very nature of podcast production also means that people can be brought together into one virtual space from different places. Panel discussions can be recorded with participants engaging from separate locations – even from home.

Online audio programmes have grown in popularity in the past couple of years because they conform to the way people live their lives. They provide a range of on-demand content according to tastes and convenience. Digital production methods also mean that the costs and barriers to making quality programmes have come down.

Podcasts are different from other forms of communication. Content is carefully curated according to the interest (and attention span) of the listener.

Podcasts are also an intimate medium, which can provide relevant content to people who may be craving a connection, information or just entertainment during a time of relative personal and professional solitude. They are the audio campfire around which people can hear and share experiences and knowledge. And at this time of collective gloom, they can provide an accompanying voice, along with some light and warmth. 


How do you carry on with business amid a pandemic? That is the question facing numerous workplaces and institutions confronting the current reality of COVID-19. This is clearly a secondary consideration to the health of individuals, but the fear and reality of infection is creating an economic crisis on top of the public health emergency.

Many businesses are already telling their staff to operate remotely – where possible, and we are all aware that this unfolding situation could affect workplaces for weeks or even months.  

Conferences, events and other gatherings are in doubt during this extraordinary period. But at the same time, it is critical that businesses keep working to maintain contacts, activity and personal connection with stakeholders, including clients and their own staff. Damage limitation and mitigation are huge considerations for the leaders of organizations and businesses – big and small – around the world.

If it can’t be business as normal, then it is critical that – at the very least – a new normality be temporarily instituted, that allows organizations to keep functioning and for the economy to keep turning. It is critical that businesses communicate what they are doing, so that when the crisis passes, they can more easily recover and return to work.

The digital age presents a partial solution to this unprecedented situation. Apart from the manufacturers of hand sanitizers and toilet paper, products which help people connect remotely are going to find themselves in demand.

But beyond Zoom, Skype and other providers which allow for remote video calls and conferencing, there is a need to consider how more in-depth communications can function and help. Organizations need to continue to display their skills, expertize and presence throughout this time. In addition, they should consider how to maintain connections between staff members who are physically dispersed. It is important that people feel fully informed and a maintain a link to their workplace.

Podcasts are one channel of communications that can serve a unique and useful purpose at this time. They provide a virtual platform to connect and exchange information. The very nature of podcast production also means that people can be brought together into one virtual space from different places. Panel discussions can be recorded with participants engaging from the separate locations – even from home.

Online audio programmes have grown in popularity in the past couple of years because they conform to the way people live their lives. They provide a range of on-demand content according to tastes and convenience. Digital production methods also mean that the costs and barriers to making quality programmes have come down.

Podcasts are different from other forms of communication.  Content is carefully curated according to the interest (and attention span) of the listener.

Podcasts are also an intimate medium, which can provide relevant content to people who may be craving a connection, information or just entertainment during a time of relative personal and professional solitude. They are the audio campfire around which people who share a personal or professional link can hear and share experiences and knowledge.  And at this time of collective gloom they can provide an accompanying voice, along with some light and warmth.

Richard Miron is the founder and CEO of Earshot Strategies Ltd, a podcast consultancy based in London